Margaret Randall

Margaret Randall
Photo by Jim Norrena
“Then I saw what the calling was :
it was the road I traveled”
- Muriel Rukeyser

My life and work have been profoundly informed by parents who gave me love and adventure, and encouraged creativity; the dramatic desert canyons, rich colors and open skies of the southwestern United States; Socialist ideals; the second wave of feminism; and the generous mentorship of many great friends and colleagues. My children, grandchildren, and great grandchild are always with me, even when far away; and my spouse Barbara is bedrock. New York’s abstract expressionist painters in the 1950s, Mexico and her struggles of the 1960s, the Cuban revolution’s second brave decade in the 1970s, the Vietnamese people’s struggle against US attack and occupation in that same decade, and the Sandinista attempt to change Nicaragua in the early 1980s were places and events that shaped me. The exploration of ancient sites continues to be a source of nourishment, and I have long been involved with oral tradition. I deeply believe in humanistic values, combating our culture of violence and greed, and art as a tool for change. I invite you to enter my website, learn about my books, read my poetry and look at my photographic images.

El Corno Emplumado 16

Time for another book. El Corno #16, the bilingual edition of 1965, was Canadian poet George Bowering’s The Man in Yellow Boots / El hombre de las botas amarillas. Sergio Mondragon did the translations, aided by Margaret Randall. A section of collages were by Roy Kiyooka, also of Canada.
George Bowering had visited us in 1964, and would remain close to the journal throughout its life. He later became poet laureate of (...)

Most recent articles

Latest articles

  • Biography

    , by Margaret Randall

    Margaret Randall is a feminist poet, writer, photographer and social activist. Born in New York City in 1936, she has lived for extended periods in Albuquerque, New York, Seville, Mexico City, Havana, and Managua. Shorter stays in Peru and North Vietnam were also formative. In the turbulent (...)

  • Where They Left You for Dead / Halfway Home

    Androgynous and very beautiful,
    they list your qualities among those others: patron saint of healers and of fish, master (and mistress?) of rivers. Doctor, hunter, fisherman, fisher woman or both, god or goddess of the gatherers, one who lives in water and on land.
    We prepare your meal: (...)

  • Stones Witness

    Memory of Samothrace
    1.
    The little girl, wearing a navy blue coat with white Peter Pan collar, holds her grandfather’s hand as they pass through the main entrance to New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. Once inside the building, she will be allowed to disengage and move off towards the many (...)

  • Gathering Rage

    Chapter 1 / Where It Suddenly Came Clear . . . (fragment)
    The scene is a solidarity conference in Managua, October 1991. A year and a half after its electoral defeat, the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN) has invited supporters of Nicaragua’s revolution to meet and analyze is (...)

  • The Price You Pay: The Hidden Cost of Women’s Relationship to Money

    The Egg Route (fragment)
    " . . . the entity called the family—that battleground, open wound, haven and theater of the absurd, which dominates each human childhood." —Adrienne Rich
    "Interdependency between women is the way to a freedom which allows the I (...)

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